loading...

Monday, 20 October 2014

PHRASAL VERBS WITH A VERB + AN ADVERB (With Example)

PHRASAL VERBS WITH A VERB + AN ADVERB
Many phrasal verbs consist of a verb followed by an adverb. Some of these phrasal verbs are intransitive and some are transitive.
I. Intransitive verbs followed by adverbs
Here are some intransitive phrasal verbs which consist of a verb followed by an adverb and each phrasal verb has its meaning.
Intransitive Phrasal Verb
Meaning
blow over
boil away
boil over
bounce back
buckle down
catch on
cloud over
die down
double up
drop in
fade away
fall off
get away
get by
give in
go on
grow up
keep on
level off
log on
log off
move in
move out
nod off
pass out
pitch in
play along
pull in
pull out
set off
settle down
settle in
show up
stay up
step down
step in
take off
touch down
tune in
watch out
wear off
pass
disappear by boiling
overflow by boiling
recover
work seriously
be widely accepted
become overcast
become less
bend over
visit
become less
become less
escape
barely succeed
admit defeat
continue
became an adult
persist in
stop rising
contact a computer
break contact with a computer system
take possession of living quarters
give up possession of living
go to sleep
faint
help
pretend to agree
arrive (of vehicles)
leave (of vehicles)
leave
become peaceful
become used to
arrive
not go to bed
resign
intervene
leave the ground
land (of places)
find a station on the radio
beware
gradually disappear
NOTE: The intransitive phrasal verb to show up is formed by the verb to show followed by the adverb up. In the following example, the phrasal verb does not have an object.
Example: At ten o’ clock, her brother showed up.
II. Transitive verbs followed by adverbs
Here are some transitive phrasal verbs which consist of a verb followed by an adverb and each phrasal verb has its meaning.
Transitive Phrasal Verb
Meaning
back up
bail out
break in
breathe in
breathe out
bring back
bring around
bring up
butter up
call in
call off
call up
cheer on
chop down
clean up
fend off
ferret out
figure out
fill in
fill out
fill up
give back
give off
hand down
hand in
hand on
hand over
hang up
hold back
iron out
knock out
lap up
lay off
leave behind
leave out
let down
live down
look up
make up
pass up
pension off
phase in
phase out
pick up
pin down
play down
point out
polish off
pull down
pull off
put away
put back
put off
reel off
rope in
rub out
rule out
scale down
sell off
set back
shout down
shrug off
single out
size up
sort out
sound out
stammer out
sum up
summon up
take in
take out
take over
talk over
tear up
think over
think up
track down
trade in
try on
try out
turn away
turn back
turn off
turn on
water down
wear out
write down
write off
write up
support
rescue
make something new fit for use
inhale
exhale
return
persuade
raise
flatter
ask to assist
cancel
telephone
cheer, encourage
fell
tidy
repel
find with difficult
solve, understand
complete
complete
make full
return
send out
give to someone younger
give to person in authority
give to another person
transfer
break a telephone connection
restrain, delay
remove
make unconscious
accept eagerly
put out of work
leave, not bring
omit
disappoint
live so that past faults are forgotten
find (information)
invent
not take advantage
dismiss with a pension
introduce gradually
cease gradually
collect
get a commitment
de-emphasize
draw attention to
finish
demolish
succeed
put in proper place
return to original location
postpone
recite a long list
persuade to help
erase
remove from consideration
reduce
dispose of by selling
delay
stop from speaking by shouting
dismiss as unimportant
select from others
assess
organize
talk with to learn the opinion of
stammer
summarize
gather
absorb
invite to a restaurant
assume control
discuss
destroy by tearing
consider
invent
search for and find
give as part payment
test clothes by putting them on
test by using
refuse admission
reverse direction
deactivate by using a switch
activate by using a switch
dilute
gradually destroy by wearing or using
make a note
cancel, regard as
compose in writing
NOTE: The transitive phrasal verb to sort out is formed from the verb to sort followed by the adverb out.
Example: We sorted out the papers.
1) The position of an object of the verb
In the case of transitive phrasal verbs consisting of a verb followed by an adverb, if the object of the verb is a nun, the object can usually either follow or precede the adverb. In the following examples, the verb objects are underlined.
Example:
- I called off the meeting.
- I called the meeting off.
NOTE: In the first example the object meeting follows the adverboff, while in the second example the object meeting precedes the adverb off.
ç However, in the case of a few phrasal verbs, a noun object must usually follow the adverb.
Example: We attempted to smooth over is the disagreement.
NOTE: In this example, the phrasal verb to smooth over is followed by the noun object disagreement. In this case, the objectdisagreement cannot be placed before the adverb over.
The following are examples of transitive phrasal verbs where a noun object must usually follow the adverb. Each phrasal verb is accompanied by its meaning and an example
The following are examples of transitive phrasal verbs where a noun object must usually follow the adverb. Each phrasal verb is accompanied by its meaning and an example of its use. The objects of the verbs are underlined.
Verbs followed by adverb followed by noun object
Phrasal Verb
Meaning
drum up
paper over
smooth over
raise
repair superficially
improve
Example:
- She has drummed up support for the plan.
- They attempted to paper over their differences.
- We tried to smooth over the station.
ç In the case of transitive phrasal verbs consisting of a verb followed by an adverb, if the object of the verb is a pronoun, the object must usually precede the adverb. In the following examples, the pronoun objects are underlined.
Example:
- I called it off.
- We attempted to smooth it over.
NOTE: In these examples, the object pronoun it precedes the adverbs off and over.
ç Most transitive phrasal verbs may be used in the passive voice.
Example:
- The meeting was called off by me.
- The disagreement was smooth over.
NOTE: In these examples, the phrasal verbs to call off and to smooth over are used in the passive voice.
2) The position of an adverb of manner modifying the verb
In the case of a phrasal verb consisting of a verb followed by an adverb, the verb and the adverb usually may not be separated by an adverb of manner. In the following example, the adverb of manner isunderline.
Example: I hurriedly called off the meeting.
NOTE: In this example, the adverb of manner hurriedly precedes the phrasal verb called off. The adverb hurriedly may also be placed at the beginning or the end of the sentence, but may not be placed between the verb called and the adverb off.
3) Stress in spoken English
When a phrasal verb consisting of a verb followed by an adverb occurs at the end of a clause, it is usually the adverb which is stressed in spoken English. In the following examples, the words which are tressed are printed in bold type.
Example:
- How did that come about?
- Please drop in whenever you have time.
NOTE: In the first example, the verb come followed by the adverbabout occurs at the end of a clause, and the adverb about is stressed. In the second example, the verb drop followed by the adverb in occurs at the end of a clause, and the adverb in is stressed.
4) Ergative verbs
It should be noted that there are a few phrasal verbs consisting of a verb followed by an adverb, which have the same meaning whether they are used transitively or intransitively.
Example:
- The engineer slowed down the train.
- The train slowed down.
NOTE: In the first example, the phrasal verb to slow down is used transitively, with the object train. In the second example, the phrasal verb to slow down is used intransitively, without naming the originator of the action. In these two examples, it can be seen that the object of the transitive verb is the subject of the intransitive verb. However, the general meaning of the two sentences is the same. Verbs which can be used in this way may be referred to as ergative verbs.
Ergative phrasal verbs
The following are examples of expressions which can function as ergative phrasal verbs and each ergative phrasal has its meaning.

Phrasal Verb
Meaning
Blare out
Blow up
Break up
Burn down
Calm down
Dry out
Get across
Liven up
Pull through
Rol up
Shut down
Wake up
Wash out
Wear away
Wear out
Make a loud sound
Destroy by an explosion
Break into pieces
Detroy by fire
Become calm
Become dry
Transmit
Become lively
Recover from, survive
Wrap into a cylinder
Close, stop working
Stop sleeping
Remove by washing
Gradually remove
Gradually destroy by using

What Is aVerb? (With Example)

Types ofverb (With example)

Transitive verbs 

 Finite verb

Non-finite verb

Linking verbs

REGULAR VERBS

IRREGULAR VERBS 

Causative verbs 

Stative verbs and dynamic verbs

OVERALLSPECIAL VERBS

Phrasal verbs

VERB +TO-INFINITIVE OR BARE INFINITIVE

VERB +TO-INFINITIVE OR GERUND

VERB +OBJECT + TO-INFINITIVE OR GERUND

Verbs + WH-CLAUSE (With Example)

HAVE/GET ANDWANT SOMETHING DONE

VERBS + TWOOBJECTS ( With Example)

MOOD (With Example)

Phrasal verbswith a verb + preposition

PHRASALVERBS WITH A VERB + AN ADVERB

DISTINGUISHING PHRASAL VERB

PHRASALVERBS WITH A VERB + AN ADVERB OR A PREPOSITION

PHRASALVERBS WITH A VERB +AN ADVERB + A PREPOSITION

No comments:

Post a Comment